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The Neglected Needle

Truth be told, everything’s been neglected around here of late. Kim was given an extension for his photography assignments, which meant another week of stress. This past week I’ve been de-stressing with extra sleep and a bit of time out doors. Today looks like a day of catching up with the very neglected housework and then, finally, the neglected needle will be put to some good use.

Hand quilting a flying geese quilt border. © Stephanie Boon, 2016 www.DawnChorusStudio.com

A few stitches

I’ve managed to grab a few minutes stitching here and there and the flying geese border on Summer Blues is slowly but surely getting there – and I’ll be slow stitching plenty more this evening! I’m still enjoying it and love the quilt, but I can’t wait to put this one to bed and get on with quilting some other things. I will remain firm though: no more quilting other projects until this one is done! (You have no idea how hard that is!)

Getting Rid of Your Old Needles

If you’re anything like me you’ll go through a hundred needles in the blink of an eye. Blunt. Bent. Snapped. Blunt needles are the bane of my quilting life – I can virtually see the points disappearing before they even touch fabric. I regularly pull one out of the pin cushion only to stick it straight back in again, because it would be a better garden dibber than quilting needle. My pin cushion looks like a porcupine and I pull out each and every needle to inspect under a strong desk lamp. I stick each one back in turn and finally give up and use the only needle I can find with a point, which happens to be an embroidery needle. Great for threading, not so great for hand quilting.

I have a large collection of blunt needles littering my work place, they’re in glass jars, hanging around on the base of a lamp, stuffed in pin cushions, loose in a little box of bits and pieces I keep on my desk. I even found some on my bedside cabinet the other day! Since the demise of the film canister I’ve run out of ideas on how to dispose of them safely. Sometimes my needles come in a plastic package and I can stuff a few back in there and bin it, but it seems to be slow going and my pile of rejects continues to grow. How do you get rid of yours? I ask, of course, with all the impending housework I have in mind!

Out and About

I’ve had some great walks this week and have been sharing some pictures on Instagram (come and join me), here are a couple of my favourites. I love the little Dexter cow I met on a walk over at Mylor yesterday. I used to live in the village, but now I live about 10 miles away so I cycled over on my bike, met a friend for a walk around the creek and some lunch at the pub. A soft mist hung in the air all day, but it was warm and sticky and felt like summer’s on the way.

 

A photo posted by Stephanie Boon (@dawnchorusstudio) on

Pond in one of the fields I cross regularly on my local walks. #pond #hedgerow #tree #skies #reflection #field #buttercups

A photo posted by Stephanie Boon (@dawnchorusstudio) on

This cow may have the shortest set of cow legs I’ve ever seen!!! #cow #dexter #noseycow #walk #mylor #cornwall #kernow

A photo posted by Stephanie Boon (@dawnchorusstudio) on


I wonder if I can squeeze in another walk today…dare I forego the housework again?!

I’m linking up with Kathy for Slow Sunday Stitching and hope to see you there.  Happy Sunday everyone!

PS let me know what you think of the layout of the new blog/website design so far, still lots to do but I’d love your feedback – thank you!

Signature: Stephie © Stephanie Boon, 2015 www.DawnchorusStudio.com

 

18 replies
  1. Quilter Kathy
    Quilter Kathy says:

    Keep going with the quilting! I do know how hard it is to resist working on other projects and to stay focused on the one you really want to be done with!
    Needle disposal is a great topic for discussion… I will post about it next week.

    Reply
  2. Celia
    Celia says:

    I put old needles etc into a pill bottle with a childproof lid, then bin it when it gets full – which takes a long time.

    Reply
    • Stephie
      Stephie says:

      I don’t see medicine containers that often Pat, other than cough mixture. I’ll ask a friend of mine who has younger children if she has anything similar – it’s a good idea, if you can get hold of one!

      Reply
  3. Karen Goad
    Karen Goad says:

    your walks look delightful – for disposable needle containers try the little plastic carton of breath mints or empty prescription bottles that is what I do

    Reply
    • Stephie
      Stephie says:

      Oh now that is a good idea Karen! A little box of Tic Tac’s would be wonderful – and I rather like the mints too. Brilliant solution thank you!!

      Reply
  4. Maureen
    Maureen says:

    Love the photos of the glorious Cornish countryside!! Takes me back many years to our holidays there, thank you! Love the Dexter, pity I couldn’t fit one in my back garden.

    Reply
    • Stephie
      Stephie says:

      Oh Maureen the Dexters were sooo cute! There were four of them and they were all so friendly. They’re very tiny (top of their heads lower than my shoulder), I’m sure you could fit in one or two! Wouldn’t want to spoil your superb garden though 🙂 x

      Reply
  5. kathysnest32
    kathysnest32 says:

    I take my needles to my doctors office and they dispose of with them there sharps disposal.
    Kathleen Mary

    Reply
    • Stephie
      Stephie says:

      Hi Kathleen Mary, good to meet you – and thanks for leaving your tip, I hadn’t thought of that one either. Talk about clueless! I’m so grateful to you lovely quilters for sharing such great ideas 🙂

      Reply
    • Stephie
      Stephie says:

      I’m so incredibly lucky Deb and I plan to make the most of it this summer with some long walks/hikes around the coast. I hope it stays as sunny as it’s been today – it’s the icing on an already very good cake!

      Reply
  6. Colleen
    Colleen says:

    At my quilt shop they use a clear glass “mason” jar with a lid with holes in it so the needles can just be dropped in I think if I used something like that it would last my whole life ….. Guessing now I think when it would be ready for disposal you would either change the lid to s solid one or tsps over the wholes . It sits on a window ledge and waits for the next pin/ needle arrival
    Colleen

    Reply
    • Stephie
      Stephie says:

      Hi Colleen, thanks for coming by and the fab tip, I think that’s the best one so far! You can get them the size of spice jars, which would be perfect – and good to look at! Lovely to meet you 🙂

      Reply

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